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Bee attractive plants

Paris, Parc de Bercy.
A quiet space, away from the hustle and bustle
Paris:  The hustle and bustle of a thorougfare

Just around the corner from the hustle and bustle!
We have arrived in Paris!  

River Seine

Bluebell

A vegetable garden within the park

During my visit to Holland, I was lucky to see a number of gardens that belonged to friends and relatives    Here are some of the bee attractive plants I saw in these gardens.

A close up of the tiny pink flower.
Unfortunately I do not know the name of this 5 foot
high bush.  The tiny pink flowers were very
attractive to bees.
Pink Delphinium
Foxglove

Holland: bicycle stall at a railway station.
Bluebell

Old city of Dordrecht, Holland
Right in front of the medical clinic on Quadra Island,  a raised bed had some surprises in store for me.  I was certainly not expecting numerous bumble bees foraging on 4 patches of sage ground cover.  We were meandering along the store fronts, and there they were- too busy to take any notice of the photographer.
Very little of the ground covers’ green leaves were visible amongst the dense layers of flowers.

There were numerous bumble bees present on these patches of sage.

The bees’ tongue is visible probing the flowers

Flower Market in Utrecht, Holland
Campanula- a bee attractive plant.
These two varieties of bee attractive Sage
Salvia, a bee attractive plant
Buying flowers at the market

Here a  few pictures of bee attractive flowers at a flower market in Utrecht, Holland.  I only took pictures of flowers that had bumble bees foraging amongst the flowers.  This is a great way to buy flowers that are bee attractive and flowers that will feed bees in your garden.

Over the past several weeks, during my travels, I kept my eyes open for ‘Bee attractive’ plant’s.  I watched out for bees on flowers knowing that these plants provide the bee with pollen or nectar or both.  Keep in mind that a ‘bee attractive plant may not always appear attractive to bees.    For instance, when more attractive (provide more food) flowers are present, bees go to the rich source of food, and not the poor source of food.  Visitation strongly depends on if other attractive flowers are present in the area.  If you don’t see any bees on a variety of flowers, it might mean temperatures are too cold, or that there are no bees in the vicinity.

Flowers provide food for bees in the form of nectar and pollen.  Thus flowers are critical to their survival.  However, not all flowers produce pollen and nectar.  The best way to find flowers that are attractive to bees is to go to a garden center on a sunny day.  Bees will point the way to attractive flowers, the ones that will provide them pollen or nectar or both.  The ultimate for bees is the have a garden that has continuous bloom from spring through the summer.

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