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Most of these Beediverse Quicklock corn nesting tunnels are plugged and filled with young developing mason bees.  Mud plugs are of varying colors indicating that different females use different sources of mudding material.  Three of the nesting holes remain unplugged and look empty although the lower open nesting hole on the lower left, contains a mason bees.  It is probably close to filling its nesting tunnel.  These nesting trays are of the newer ‘wood’ colors except the blue which gives the trays some color to help with the bees’ orientation.  Overall, this spring nesting was mostly successful.  In many cases, production looks like it will be more than the number of cocoons set out in the early spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello Margriet, Finally, I am attaching photos, as promised some time ago, of the bee condo structure my husband and I designed and built at our community garden in False Creek, Vancouver, BC.

Since we put it up fairly late in the season, we were too late for any bees to take up residency, but we are planning on getting cocoons next spring to “kick start” the cycle.

I hope you enjoy the photos. Kind regards,  Monica

 

Hi Monica,

Thanks for the photos.  This is a good workable shelter for mason bees when there are no other structures around to attach your nests.    Others who work in community gardens might very well use this idea themselves.   I recommend taking the nest down until early spring when you set out your bee cocoons to avoid any winter mishaps.

Hi, Bee Diverse,

I work at an ecological non profit in Vancouver at which we keep mason bees.  I just finished watching your DVD, All About Mason Bees, and I wanted to thank you for making such a fantastic informative video.  The infra red footage was really spectacular.  As the video began, I thought to myself – “But what is it like IN the cell?  How does the bee pack the pollen and the mud?  What does it look like?”  And then, voila!  That footage was amazing!
Thanks so much,
Kristjanne V
 

We now have available, both the Chalet and Highrise with specifically designed nests for the leafcutter bee.  In addition, the Chalet and one of the Highrises, also has the cardboard wrap for the other small summer mason bees. With or without bees, this refuge and nesting site is a boon for increasing your summer pollinators.  At this time leafcutter bees are availabe in Canada only.

Click here to go to beediverse website

Leafcutter bee cocoons.  Different colored cocoons are made from  leaves and petals..
.
Leafcutter bee Highrise
 Leafcutter Highrise-availabe soon



Extra space in the attic for storing and emerging cocoons.



Emerging cocoons in cardboard box.
A predator  guard in front of the nest
 protects nests and bees
Nests and bee cocoons behind predator guard.
In the fall-Step one- lift nest block out of Highrise.
In the fall-Step 2- push cocoons out with wooden dowel (supplied) and store in attic under roof of Highrise.

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