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Monthly Archives: February 2011

The reason for setting out cocoons within the protection of a house that shelters nesting tunnels, is to provide the cocoons, and the mason bees inside, a place that is protected from predators like mice, protected from the sun and protected from rain and snow.

It depends on the design of the house whether cocoons can simply be set within the house, like underneath the roof of the Highrise or whether space needs to be created for the vial like in the Starter Cottage.
Royal house with predator guard

Temporarily remove predator guard from the front of the Royal house,
and set vial on its side, with tab removed,  underneath peaked roof.
 Replace predator guard.
The Royal house is similar to the Highrise.  Simply remove predator guard, and set vial on its side underneath the peaked roof.
If you have a Lodge- without the predator guard, or the Chalet with a predator guard, space needs to be created for the vial containing cocoons.  Remove one set of trays, insert vial above trays and replace vial with tray when all bees have emerged.
Lodge without predator guard.
Chalet with predator guard.
Unwrap bundle of nesting trays by removing electricians tape.  Remove
one set of trays, and re-tape remaining nesting trays.
The vial can now be inserted under the roof and adjacent to the nesting tunnels.

Replace the predator guard of the Chalet after vial has been set
inside the house.  When all bees have emerged- about 2 weeks
after first bees emerge, remove vial, tape up the individual tray
 and set above other trays.
If you buy a vial of Beediverse Mason Bee cocoons
from a store, the cocoons need to be set it out adjacent to mason
bee nesting tunnels.  Cocoons are
washed, screened and candled before packaging them into vials.
If you have a Starter Cottage
 with cardboard tubes it is best to set the vial of
cocoons inside the cottage amongst the nesting tubes.

Temporarily remove front door to access
cardboard tubes.

Remove a few cardboard tube to make room for one vial
containing mason bee cocoons.
Remove red tab covering the exit hole of the vial, and place
vial amongst tubes.

Replace front door and hang Starter Cottage on an East facing wall,
 in the sunshine and out of the rain.  This cottage can also be
 set down on a shelf.  Make sure it is secure so the wind
or predators do not knock it off the shelf.
Retail stores sell Beediverse mason bee cocoons in snap-cap vials.
Cocoons were harvested from nesting tunnels and cleaned. 

The Highrise contains Eco friendly Corn Quicklock nesting trays.
Setting cocoons above nesting tunnels makes it easy for bees to find their new nests.
Remove red tab that covers the vials’s exit hole,
and lay vial with cocoons in the attic and underneath
the roof.of the Highrise.
Loose cocoons harvested from nesting tunnels can also be placed
underneath the roof of the Highrise-”the attic”
Move cocoons towards the back. of the Highrise
so they dont roll out the exit gap.
Drop roof over attic in readiness for spring.



Dave M.’s emergence box with nests on either side.
Emerged males are clustered on the outside of the emergence box waiting for females to emerge.





Close-up of emerged males on the outside of the emergence box.  Emergence hole of the box is visible below the hook.
The white clay  spots on the front of the emergence box are the first signs that bees have emerged.  Bees defecate this material as soon as they emerge. 


Dave uses stacked pieces of routered wood as nesting tunnels.  The emergence box removes the problem of predation during emergence.  Photo credits  Dave M.  Port Alberni.

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