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Daily Archives: February 14, 2011



Dave M.’s emergence box with nests on either side.
Emerged males are clustered on the outside of the emergence box waiting for females to emerge.





Close-up of emerged males on the outside of the emergence box.  Emergence hole of the box is visible below the hook.
The white clay  spots on the front of the emergence box are the first signs that bees have emerged.  Bees defecate this material as soon as they emerge. 


Dave uses stacked pieces of routered wood as nesting tunnels.  The emergence box removes the problem of predation during emergence.  Photo credits  Dave M.  Port Alberni.

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