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Monthly Archives: March 2011

The Beez Neez (Snohomish,WA) booth was no doubt a booth about mason bee homes.  Two fruit trees were set at the back to tell people that these bees are great pollinators for tree fruit pollination.  A Pieris japonica was also part of the display to tell people that this plant is a great food source for mason bees that emerge early in spring.  
Highrises (On left hand side of the table) were a favourate for customers who still had to set out a couple of hundred cocoons or more.  It is very easy to set out cocoons with the Highrise by simply laying cocoons underneath the roof.  The Lodge was a fast seller to people starting out with mason bees (Square box home) and to people who wanted a mason bee home that was ‘ready to use”.  The ECO Corn Quicklock trays were a great seller to the handyman and the Royal always a favourate as a gift (curved roof- in center of display).
The wasp-proof net bag was also displayed to show that it is a very useful item to prevent parasitism of newly formed mason bees.  This is done after spring flight.
Mugs with a mason bee and the Beediverse logo made a great display!

If you are interested in reading about a certain topic use the SEARCH window just below the Welcome notice of this blog, rather than scrolling through all the blogs and manually searching through all blogs.

You type a word or series of words into the SEARCH window and it finds the articles that include the specific words.
For example:
setting out cocoons    4 articles
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It is a great way  to find articles with a specific topic.

Spring is a great time of year to get started with mason bees.

Having your own mason bees to pollinate your fruit trees helps to get a better fruit set, more and larger fruit.

Wherever you live, set out a mason bee home on a East facing wall, under cover from the rain, and in the sunshine.

Mason bees are present in North America, Asia, and in Europe.  Each continent with its own species.  Their nesting habits are the same.

You get better results if you set out a 5-6 homes for mason bees in your region.  With more nests, it is more likely that one of the nest is placed where a local mason bee will find it.  She will then produce offspring for you for next spring’s pollination season.

To keep mason bees healthy every year, harvest cocoons, clean out the nest and set the clean home out ready for spring.
Mor information on cleaning cocoons and nest can be found in my book “Pollination with Mason Bees”.  Available from your store or our on line web site Beediverse.com

Spring is a busy season for everyone!

Stores are stocked up with mason bee homes, books and DVD’s.  Most gardeners have set out their cleaned mason bee home and are ready for the bees to come out.  Some new mason bee enthusiasts, missed out on getting their mason bees, but they are still setting out their bee homes, because a female in the area, might find the nest and produce offspring for next year.

Nectarine and peach blossoms are opening up in California.  This is also happening in Arizona, but a recent frost likely damaged a lot of blossoms.

Here in Vancouver BC temperatures are still cool, but Pieris japonicus is out especially in protected areas such as alongside buildings.

Rex Welland always told me that in the warmer Victoria (BC), mason bees would come out mid-March, and fill their first nesting tubes by late March.  Right on schedule!

Watch out for the tell tale sign of clay-like deposits on the front of the nest.  These are the first droppings of the newly emerged bees.

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