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Daily Archives: June 11, 2011

Over the past several weeks, during my travels, I kept my eyes open for ‘Bee attractive’ plant’s.  I watched out for bees on flowers knowing that these plants provide the bee with pollen or nectar or both.  Keep in mind that a ‘bee attractive plant may not always appear attractive to bees.    For instance, when more attractive (provide more food) flowers are present, bees go to the rich source of food, and not the poor source of food.  Visitation strongly depends on if other attractive flowers are present in the area.  If you don’t see any bees on a variety of flowers, it might mean temperatures are too cold, or that there are no bees in the vicinity.

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