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Monthly Archives: July 2011

In the spring, Joe S. and I chatted about providing continuous bloom for bees in his garden.  When one type of flower has finished blooming there should be other flowers just beginning to open and bloom.  Continuous bloom is an important part of managing a continuous food supply for wild bees.

When I photographed his spring blooming flowers, he mentioned that the following bloom would provide food for his summer bees including summer mason bees.

Sedum
Budlea
Italian herbs
Catony aster

This beautiful and wonderfully scented rose is a mega-attractant to bees.

 A old variety that has a great capacity for nectar production.  It was quite amazing to see so many bumble bees in  one flower. It was like they were standing in line for some nectar.  Bumble bees were so busy getting into the flower they took no notice of the photographer.
This rose bush stands about 4 feet tall.

This rose is so attractive to bumble bees that at one
point there were 6 bees inside this one flower.

More bees in this rose.

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