Monthly Archives: September 2011

I have uploaded a few more videos on Youtube today.  Three of my earlier uploads were without a voice.  This was corrected today.  I created these video clip to answer questions about mason bees.  One of the most common questions is about how to set out mason bees.  The video clip shows how to set out a container of cocoons into the nest whether there are small or large quantities of cocons.  If you have any suggestions about a topic for a video clip, let me know.

I have added two new video clips onto U-tube.  These describe what size mason bee homes you can start off with when you have a small garden or a small orchard.   The u-tube icons are on the top right hand corner of this blog.

This little mason bee Osmia californica, emerges soon after the early spring mason bee Osmia lignaria.  We have supplies of Osmia californica available for our customers  Click here for ordering your mason bees
This little bee uses smaller nesting holes and has chewed leaf material as its nest plug.  It will double the pollination season for your garden.  Each bee nests and pollinates for about a month.Click here for more details about Osmia Californica

I saw a very interesting article in the National Post today.  Rick Spence writes about blogs and what makes a good blog.  He writes that blogging was in its heyday 5 years ago and wanders if blogging has lost its ‘mojo’.  He does not think so.  He writes that it is a great way of communicating with people who are interested in a company’s products and expertise.  Rick includes a lot of ideas such as: writing on favourate topics, insider stories about products, stories about the industry, product development, product reviews, customer success stories, ‘…current issues rocking the industry…’. A lot of bloggers have given up because it is hard work. I agree that it is hard work, but feedback and ideas from people is always great.  Keep the comments coming and let us here about your success stories and ideas. 
Link to National post article “-Yes-a-blog

Mites are pests for mason bees.  Bees carry them from their old nest to their new nests, and then mites compete for food with the young developing bees.  Mostly, if mites get into a cell with a developing bee and its pollen lump, mites will be the end result- not a bee. 

Because mites on the surface of cocoons are waiting to be transported to a new nest by the emerging bee, it is imperative to get rid of most, if not all surface mites.  Washing will remove the majority or mites.  Rolling cocoons over a metal screen will remove the majority of the remaining mites.

Further reading on mite control  ______________
A great DVD on How to _________________

Here are a few pictures of

Mites are transported by bees from the old nest to the new.

Mites travel within the nesting tunnel to a cocoon
Mites under a microscope

Because of customer demand we will have Viewing boxes/Observation boxes available this upcoming season.  This is a great teaching tool.

Viewing box closed and open showing the nesting tray.
Viewing box with open lid showing
nesting tray and cotton cover.
Open viewing box showing
cotton cover and entrance hole to box.
Open viewing box showing
wooden nesting  tray.