Monthly Archives: December 2013

   When bee finds a nesting tunnel in wood, plastic or some other material, the female bee will place mud inside the cavity to create the perfectly shaped cavity for her offspring. 

 

This photo shows two nesting tunnels (half of two nesting tunnels) containing two cocoons inside their mud cavities.  

When nesting trays are not completely snapped togethr, a gap is present and lets air into the nesting tunnel.  Consequently the mason bees muds over the gap  forming a super – wall.

Tiny parasitic wasp of mason bees

Margriet,

Can you verify that this picture is a Parasitic Wasp (or not)?

Thanks.
Valeri Wade
Wild Bird Chalet
705 Kentucky Street
Bellingham, WA 98225
360-734-0969
 

 

Hi  Valerie, Thanks for sharing this photo with us and our friends.  Yes this tiny little wasp is a parasitic wasp of mason bees (and other insects).  You can see from the size of the cocoon in the background how tiny this critter really is!  At the moment that this picture was taken, this wasp was listening for bee movement inside the cocoon  ( it hears with its antennae).  Only live bees are parasitized!!  Great picture Valerie.